Latest News

Intraoperative Aberrometry & Cataract Le...
What Is Intraoperative Aberrometry? Yes, that is a mouthful, but the concept isn’t quite as hard as the name....
Why Get an Early Eye Exam for Your Young...
What do Amblyopia, Strabismus, and Convergence Insufficiency all have in common? These are all serious and relatively co...
I'm seeing jagged lines in my vision! H...
Have you ever seen a temporary black spot in your vision? How about jagged white lines? Something that looks like heat w...
Why Rubbing Your Eyes Is a Mistake
When your eyes feel itchy, it’s a natural reaction to want to rub, rub, rub. It temporarily relieves the itching,...
My New Glasses Aren't Working for Me
Eye doctors typically pride themselves on being able to improve someone’s vision through glasses or contact lens p...
myopia article
 
Hyperopia and Myopia

Myopia is the condition of being nearsighted. When it is an inherited condition, myopia begins early in life.  People with this condition can usually see near objects, but they struggle to see distant objects. Myopia is the opposite of hyperopia, or farsightedness.  In myopia, the anatomy of the eyeball, or globe, is longer than normal. This causes the light to focus in front of the retina, blurring the distance vision.  Myopia is corrected with glasses and contact lenses, or with laser vision correction. Laser vision correction is only recommended for people over 18 years old, when the eye has finished growing to adult size.

To correct the symptoms of myopia with glasses, lenses are used that are thicker on the edges and thinner in the middle. This is known as a concave lens, which can be cosmetically improved in higher prescriptions with a high index lens.

Myopes are also at increased risk for a retinal detachment. The signs and symptoms of a retinal detachment are flashing lights, black floaters, or a curtain over the vision. The risk of detachment is typically less than 3 percent.