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Swimming and Contacts Don't Mix
It's the summer and one of the most common questions eye doctors are asked is, “Is it safe to swim in my contact l...
Why do I need glasses if I have contact...
There is an old adage in the eye care industry: Glasses are a necessity, contact lenses are a luxury. Ninety-nine percen...
Can you guess the most dangerous sports...
Philadelphia Phillies prospect Matt Imhof lost his right eye in 2016 after suffering a freak injury during a normal trai...
Are My Eyes Changing Colors?
It can be common that eye doctors get patients who come in asking if the white part of their eye, the sclera, has a grow...
Eye Safety on the 4th of July
Fireworks Eye Injuries Have More Than Doubled in Recent Years Fireworks sales will be blazing across the country from...
 

If you have ever felt frustrated at needing both prescription glasses and prescription sunglasses to accommodate an outdoor lifestyle, you should consider photochromic lenses. Photochromic lenses darken when exposed to UV rays. The change is caused by photochromic molecules that are incorporated into the lens or into a coating on the lens. When the wearer goes outside when it's bright, the lenses darken automatically. When the wearer goes back inside, the glasses become clear.

There are a variety of photochromic options available. Depending on what you choose, you can customize the lenses to your needs. Some lenses darken only in direct sunlight, while others darken in little or no direct light. Some are designed to darken while you are in the car to reduce road glare while you are driving. You can even choose the color of the tint. Ask your doctor what options are available.